LESA Researcher Shayla Sawyer’s BioEngineering Work Mentioned in Scientific American Article
LESA Researcher Shayla Sawyer’s BioEngineering Work Mentioned in Scientific American Article

LESA Researcher Shayla Sawyer’s BioEngineering Work Mentioned in Scientific American Article

Electrical engineers have found a way to use bacteria [that can breathe anaerobically, or without oxygen] to manufacture an up-and-coming two-dimensional material called molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which can form a sheet just a few atoms thick and holds promise for future electronics. These metal-breathing bacteria could transform electronics, biosensors, and more. The new finding, published in Biointerphases, could help avoid a daunting synthesis process that requires a harsh environment.  “Graphene is the breakout superstar of the two-dimensional materials,” says Shayla Sawyer, an electrical engineer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a senior author of the paper. – Karen Kwon